H.I.I.T. the Ground Running

What is H.I.I.T.?
H.I.I.T stands for high-intensity interval training, which is a method of improving cardiovascular fitness that has quickly gained popularity due to its many health benefits. It usually involves a period of high-intensity work followed by one of a lower intensity interval, allowing the body time to buffer lactic acid in order prepare for the next cycle. The high-intensity period should be performed at a level that approaches a person’s VO2max. VO2max is a measure of the maximal amount of oxygen that a person’s body is able to use efficiently, by perfusing it through the blood to used by the muscles to prevent fatigue.

The formula to calculate VO2max is:
(ml/kg/min) = 132.853 – (0.0769 x body weight in [pounds]) – (0.3877 x age [years]) + (6.3150 x gender [female = 0; male = 1]) – (3.2649 x 1-mile walk time [in minutes and hundredths]) – (0.1565 x 1-minute heart rate at end of mile [beats per minute]).
However, if you don’t feel like going through all that there’s a much easier way to ensure that you are reaching the right level of intensity. In short, you should basically feel like your legs are falling off and your heart is going to beat out of your chest during the high-intensity intervals.

Work to rest ratios of 2:1 or 1:1 are commonly used and repeated around ten times, making sure to include a warm up and cool down. These workouts typically take around 30 minutes to complete.

Why do we love H.I.I.T.?
H.I.I.T. workouts provide a multitude of positive cardiovascular and metabolic. In addition to receiving both anaerobic and aerobic benefits of training, H.I.I.T. has been shown to cause great cardiovascular gains in VO2max, significant reductions in fat mass, increased the buffering ability of the muscle to prevent fatigue as compared to traditional moderate intensity endurance training. In other words, H.I.I.T. is more effective for losing weight and increasing cardiovascular endurance, while maintaining muscle mass at the same time! It has even been shown to lower insulin resistance and increase insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. Another exciting effect of this type of workout is called EPOC (excess post-exercise oxygen consumption). This means that the body continues to function at a higher metabolic rate for a long time after finishing a workout in order to help the body recover. It has shown that people can burn up to 15% more calories in the hours after finishing H.I.I.T. Interval training can be easily adapted to many different modes of exercise such as cycling, stair climbing, and running.

H.I.I.T Treadmill workout:
Before beginning choose “interval-training” option on the treadmill and program in your rest speed and high-intensity speed to make it faster when switching between the two. I usually set my low at level 4.0 and my high at around 10.7. These can easily be adapted to be done on a regular track if you don’t have access to a gym by using a phone or watch to time the intervals.

L = low speed
H = high speed

L – 3 minutes
H – 1 min
L – 2 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 1min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 2 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 2 min
H -1 min
L – 3 min
Total time: 28 minutes

L – 3 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 2 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 2 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 1 min
H – 1 min
L – 3 min
Total time: 25 minutes

L -3 min
H – 1 min
L – 2 min
H – 2 min
H – 2 min
L – 2 min
H – 2 min
L – 3 min
H – 2 min
L – 2 min
H – 2 min
L – 2 min
H – 1 min
L – 3 min
Total time: 31 minutes

Works Cited

 

 

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